SWEETS FROM MOROCCO, THE SWEET SIDE OF THE MAGHREB


 

Little is said about Africa in America and this 2018 in the blog we will be opening the doors to foods of the world and Mexico that are little known.

In the sugary world of this Maghreb country, desserts are perfumed with spices, flowers, and nuts in festive settings, or eaten in the form of fresh fruit in everyday life: the delicacy of the preparations is also in the aromas.

DESSERT, A DIFFERENT IDEA BETWEEN CULTURES

The idea of dessert is not the same for everyone, and perhaps the most widespread notion comes from French pastry. Meringues, cakes, cookies, and macaroni are part of the opulent and seductive banquets, or simple meals. It’s that “golden brooch” that many people are waiting for.

But the sweets in Morocco change according to the type of food that is made: if it is a daily one, fruits are eaten available in season; if some social or religious celebration is celebrated, they are elaborated with more complex recipes with honey, pistachios, and walnuts, among others.

FROM THE COUNTRYSIDE TO THE DESSERT, FROM THE SOUKS TO THE TABLES

Whether you’re in quiet Rissani, a village in the Ziz Valley, or in bustling Marrakech, one of its main cities, you’ll find a wide variety of fruit in the streets and markets – known as souks in the Arab world. You’ll be surprised by the huge size of the yellow melons and watermelons, but you’ll be more fascinated by them: when you break them they look like honey.

Eat the cherries that are in the carts in Meknes or drink an orange juice in the Medina of Fez or Marrakech (so far, is the richest thing I tasted in those cities). That act is democratic: tourists and Moroccans of different incomes do it, paying a few dirhams, their local currency.

Orange is something special to spoil: its segments are sprinkled with cinnamon and it is even a dish on the tasting menu of La Tanjia, a famous restaurant in Marrakech. If you’re lucky, it will also be given to you as a hospital sample at the Berber rug cooperative shop in Ksar d’Aït Ben Haddou et Ouarzazate.

CO-OPERATIVES AND INGREDIENTS FOR MOROCCAN SWEETS

Moroccans take advantage of their culinary heritage and transform their environment to bring it to their table. The orchards, palm groves and cooperatives are spaces created to provide sustenance to families and from where some ingredients for desserts come out.

In Takarkourte in the Tahanaout area, 30 women work to obtain artisanal derivatives of argan, a species endemic to southwestern Morocco that is ground with a kind of molcajete and obtain a paste that is mixed with almonds to make groceries such as amlou, a creamy cream that accompanies bread and other foods.

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